Tenebrionidae
    Since the publication of Brendell's handbook dealing with this family, its limits have broadened to include the former families Lagriidae and Cistellidae (Alleculidae), fortunately both groups were dealt with in the earlier handbook by Buck. In Great Britain the Tenebrionidae now includes 47 species in 37 genera in 6 subfamilies, other species are occasionally introduced with imported goods. Part of the Heteromera, both sexes of all species have 5-5-4 tarsal formula. 2.4-26mm. Antennae usually 11 segmented, filiform or gradually thickened, serrate in Pseudocistella (Alleculinae) or occasionally clubbed e.g. Lathoeticus (5 segmented) or Tribolium castaneum Duval (3 segmented). Inserted on the side of the head before the eyes or behind the mandibles; in Lagria on tubercles in front of deeply incised eyes, in Alleculinae the insertions are visible from above (except in Mycetochara), in the remaining subfamilies the insertions and generally some of the base of the first segment are hidden by genae which may extend back to divide the eyes to some extent. With the exception of Lagria all species have simple hind tarsi (In Melandryidae segment 3 is bilobed). Claws simple, pectinate in Alleculinae.
In purely practical terms the Heteromera can be divided into two groups by comparing the relative widths of the pronotum and elytral base. In one group the pronotum is much narrower (e.g Pyrochroidae or Oedemeridae), of those families where the pronotum is not, or barely, narrower the Rhipiphaidae and Mordellidae are distinctive, Melandryidae are morphologically very varied but distinctive from Tenebrionidae on hind tarsal structure. In this sense Lagria is awkward but fortunately very distinctive. Most species are distinctive enough to become quickly familiar. Generally glabrous, some species have fused elytra. Some Diaperinae are brightly coloured and may at a glance be taken for Chrysomelidae e.g Diaperis, Scaphidema, Platydema or Alphitophaga. Most are active nocturnally.
   Diaperinae are beetles of decaying wood, fungi and vegetable matter. In Bolitophagus reticulatus (L.) (5-8mm) and Eledona agricola (Hbst.) (1.3-1.8mm) the pronotal margins are crenulate, unique to british species. Both are widespread, Bolitophagus is local, Eledona is described as 'fairly common' in Brendell. Both are found in bracket fungi. Diaperis is featured. Scaphidema metallicum (F.)(4-5.4mm) is associated with dead or decaying wood throughout England except for the far north and should be expected locally as it was common across northwest Middx. and south Herts. following Dutch Elm Disease in the 1970's and 80's. Platydema violaceum (F.)(7.5-8.25mm) is very rare with records from Hampshire and Surrey, larvae and adults inhabit fungi on Alder and Elm (Alexander). Alphitophagus bifasciatus (Say) (2-2.2.5mm) 'The Two-Banded Fungus beetle' is widespread in England and associated with fungi and decaying vegetable matter e.g. in granaries, compost heaps and in tree stumps. Testaceus with elytral suture and two transverse marks black, hence the common name. Pentaphyllus testaceus (Hellwig) is a small (2.5mm) yellow or orange beetle associated with fungi, decaying trees and leaf mould on the continent. Its inclusion on the british list is based on a single record from Hornsey, N.London, 1876 . Uloma is featured. Gnatocerus (2 spp.) and Tribolium (3 spp.) are small beetles. 2.3-5.75mm associated with stored products and granaries, generally widespread throughout Britain and can be common. Tribolium destructor Uyttenboogaart and Gnatocerus maxillosus (F.) are only occasionally imported to Britain. Latheticus oryzae Waterhouse, C.O. (2.75-3mm) is occasionally imported with cereal products but cannot survive outside heated environments. Both our species of Palorus are found among imports of grain and cereal. Our two Alphitobius species are widespread and associated with a wide variety of stored products but they occasionally survive in the wild in or around decaying timber (Alexander). Four species of Corticeus (2.25-7mm) are found under bark where they predate Scolytid and other beetles. C.bicolor (Ol.) and C.fraxini (Kugelann) are widespread and may be locally common.

Janson, O.E. 1903. Pentaphyllus testaceus an unrecorded addition to the british Coleoptera. Ent.Rec.J.Var. 15:128

   Myrmechixeninae Formerly included in Colyiidae our 2 species are very rare, Myrmechixenus subterraneus Chevrolat not recorded since 1970 and M.vaporariorum Guerin-Meneville only recorded from Worcs. and Northants. since 1970 (Hyman). Both species are associated with ants.
   Tenebrioninae Our three species of Blaps are large, 18-26mm, dull black beetles of characteristic shape. Only B.mucronata Lat. is likely to be encountered, it is fairly common and widely distributed throughout England, Wales and Scotland. The beetle inhabits cellars and outhouses and are nocturnal omniverous scavengers. It should only be a matter of time before the species is added to the Watford list as during 2004 and 2005 several Blaps sp. were found resting diurnally at the base of a wall beneath a ventilation vent by Watford market. Unfortunately none were taken for examination. 'Fast' food remains are often discarded here and no doubt this attracts the beetles. B.mortisaga and B.lethifera Mars. were last recorded during the 1950's Mendel). Tenebrio and Nalassus are featured. Helops caeruleus (L.) is a large blue or purple species with black appendages. Widespread but local in decaying deciduous trees and rarely from pine. Xanthomus pallidus (Curtis)(6-10mm) along with Nalassus were formerly included in the genus Cylindrinotus. A local maritime species inhabiting sandy areas behind beaches, often at the base of Ammophila (Marram grass).
   Opatrinae Phylan gibbus (F.) (7-8.25mm) is a closely punctured shining black species of sand dunes, local around the English, Welsh and Scottish coasts. Opatrum sabulosum (L.)(7-9mm) and Melanimon tibialis (F.)(3-4.5mm) are dull black species with raised lines on the elytra; two in Melanimon and three in Opatrum. Boh species inhabit sandy areas at the base of plants and under debris etc. In each case there are a few inland records. Phaleria cadaverina (F.)(5-7.5mm) is testaceous with dark elytral marks. A scarce species of sandy coasts found under seaweed, among decaying vegetation and in carrion. Crypticus quisquilius (L.) (4.5-7mm) is another sandy coast species with a few inland records. A black species with the basal antennal segments and legs yellow, the elytra have obscurely punctate striae.
   Alleculinae Prionychus is featured. Gonodera luperus (Hbst.)(7-9mm) is a shining black beetle with red legs. Adults are diurnal and may be found at blossom (Buck), larvae are presumed to be saproxylic (Alexander). Usually from calcareous woodland. Pseudocistela ceramboides (L.)(9-13mm) is a southern English species associated with wooded pasture, adults on blossom or in decaying broadleaved trees from May to July (Joy) develop in decaying wood (Alexander). Entirely black with yellowish elytra.Isomira murina(L.)(5.5-7mm) is widespread throughout England and Scotland. Adults are found on blossom. Head and thorax black, eltra pubescent. testaceous or black, appendages testaceous, antennae darkened apically. Mycetochara humeralis (F.)(5.5-6mm) is black with yellow humeral marks and legs. A southern English species associated with woodland, adults are usually found beneath bark (Alexander). Cteniopus sulphureus (L.)(8-10mm) is commonly known as the 'Sulphur beetle', it is entirely yellow although ab. bicolor F. has the head and pronotum dark brown. A southern English species, generally maritime but there are inland records. Omophlus rufitarsis (Leske)(8-10mm) is a very local species from the weymouth area, adults on Armeria vulgaris.
   Lagriinae contains two species of Lagria. L.hirtus is featured.
   With the exception of Myrmechixeninae all our species but for Uloma are keyed out in Brendell and Buck (Cistellidae). Joy omits Blaps mortisaga (L.), Gnatocerus maxillosus (F.), Tribolim destructor Uytt., Uloma culinaris (L.) and Lagria atripes (Muls.). Hickin provides notes on some species occasionally introduced into Britain . The group is dealt with by Kaszab, Z in Vol. 8 of Freude's Die Kafer Mitteleuropas.
 
Diaperinae

Diaperis
boleti

Diaperis
boleti

Alphitobius

Alphitophagus

Corticeus

Scaphidema

Gnatocerus
 
Tenebrioninae

Eledona
agricola

Blaps
mucronata

Nalassus
laevioctostriatus

Nalassus
laevioctostriatus

Nalassus
laevioctostriatus

Tenebrio
Molitor

Tenebrio
Molitor

Tenebrio
Molitor

Tenebrio
Molitor

Uloma
culinaris

Blaps
 
Opatrinae

Crypticus

Melanimon

Opatrum

Phaleria

Phylan
 
Alleculinae

Prionychus
ater

Isomira
murina
 
Lagriinae

Lagria
hirta

Lagria
hirta

Lagria
hirta

Lagria
hirta

Lagria
hirta