Curculio glandium Marsham, 1802

Female
A widespread and locally common species throughout the southeast north to Nottinghamshire and west to the New Forest, the Severn estuary and southeast Wales (NBN). Joy gives England south to Derby, local. Adults are associated with Oak in a wide range of situations; woodland generally but especially near open woodland borders, open wooded parkland, gardens and on individual trees in urban situations. The beetle is common, and sometimes abundant, throughout our Watford area, adults appear in May or early June and remain until the autumn. The ancient oaks in Cassiobury park host large populations every year but the beetles will be found on acorn bearing oaks of all ages from the smallest saplings. On the warmest nights through the summer we have recorded adults at MV in a wide variety of habitats including town centre gardens which are, or appear to be, quite remote from the host plant.
Adults are readily swept or beaten from the host plant and are easy to observe; after capture they will walk slowly even when picked up and with a little experience are easy to identify. The female is soon recognised by the much longer rostrum, this is used to pierce and burrow into acorns prior to ovipositing. Larvae feed through the summer and fall to the ground with the acorn, feeding continues here and when fully grown they emerge and burrow into the soil to pupate. Adults emerge from the soil the following spring.

4.1-6.7mm (Morris). A broad elongate species appearing brown in the field, widest behind shoulders and rather strongly contracted to apex. Legs and rostrum very long. Antennae red with club darker, long and slender; scape and segments 2-8 (more especially 2-4) very long, abruptly thickened at apex, club 4 segmented, slender and pointed. Inserted near middle of rostrum in male, within basal third in female. Rostrum finely punctate towards base (X20), narrowed beyond antennal insertions in male. Much longer in female; rostrum:body length 19:24, in male 1:2. Eyes occupying almost entire head. Clypeus strongly punctured. Pronotum black, strongly and densely punctured and usually with a smooth longitudinal area at centre. Sides gently curved and strongly narrowed to front angles, hind margin strongly sinuate. Scutellum quadrate (cf venosus), care must be taken with this as it is usually densely scaled. Elytra slightly elongate; length to width at base about 7:6 (cf venosus), black with ten well impressed striae (counted across the middle), interstices flat and strongly rugose. With well developed humeral and subapical prominences and depressed around scutellum. Entire beetle with dense, recumbent brown and yellowish brown elongate and narrow scaling, these generally form transverse patterns on the elytra. Scaling recumbent throughout ie not raised over the apical part as in C.nucum. Legs red, darkened apically and at joints. Femora widest beyond middle and strongly toothed beneath; anterior pair more strongly so in male. Mid and hind tibiae with 'combs' of erect, dark setae near apex. Fourth tarsal segment strongly bilobed in both sexes, last segment long. Claws toothed at base and free.

Description from 6 female and 7 male Watford specimens at X20


Male

Female

Male